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Discovering the causes of cancer and the means of prevention
 

2022 - Inclusivity Minute

    • Importance of Disaggregated Asian American Data
      , by Jacqueline B. Vo (REB) and Jaimie Z. Shing (IIB)

      Asian Americans are vastly diverse in ethnicity, language, immigration patterns, cultural beliefs, English proficiency, health outcomes, and socioeconomic status. The authors discuss improving health research of this population by disaggregating ethnicity data by country of origin (e.g., Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Asian Indian, Filipino) and utilizing reference groups other than non-Hispanic White.

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    • Neurodiversity
      , by DCEG Staff

      Neurodiversity describes the variation in the human experience of the world, in school, at work, and through social relationships. Driven by both genetic and environmental factors, an estimated 15-20 percent of the world population exhibits some form of neurodivergence. Neurodiverse individuals possess unique strengths that can improve productivity, quality, innovation, and engagement when they are working in a neurodivergent-friendly environment.

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    • Beyond the Gender Binary
      , by DCEG Staff

      The gender binary describes the inaccurate concept that gender is categorized into only two distinct forms (i.e. man/woman). Many gender-expansive identities exist either between or outside of this binary, such as genderfluid, genderqueer, non-binary or agender. Various pronouns like the singular, third person "they" may be used to reflect gender neutrality.

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    • Black Futures Month
      , by DCEG Staff

      Black Futures Month, established in 2015, is a “visionary, forward-looking spin on celebrations of Blackness in February.”

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    • Global Health Research Equity
      , by DCEG Staff

      The history of global health research, having evolved from colonial and tropical medicine, is rife with inequities due to unequal distribution of power. The authors discuss the background of inequities, and what actions can and should be taken to achieve global health equity, including removal of all forms of classism, racism, and sexism.

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