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Discovering the causes of cancer and the means of prevention
 

Inclusivity Minute

The Inclusivity Minute email project began in 2018 as a joint effort between the DCEG Fellows Committee and the Office of the Director to cultivate a culture of inclusion in the Division. Monthly Inclusivity Minute email messages are archived below; each addresses relevant topics and provides resources for learning more. Read more About the Inclusivity Minute Email Project.

    • Hispanic, Latino/a, Latinx, Latine: Disentangling the identities of Hispanic/Latino Americans
      , by Staff from DCEG and DCCPS (see Contributing Authors below)

      From 2010 to 2020, Hispanic/Latino/a/x/e individuals accounted for 52 percent of the total population growth in the U.S.; studies in this group will be important to understand their unique potential health problems and disparities that may impact these communities. However, many current research studies aggregate Hispanic/Latino/a/x/e people into one group. Disaggregated data are imperative to fully understand the cancer burden and health disparities among these populations and to inform targeted cancer prevention and control efforts.

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    • What is Health Disparities Research?
      , by DCEG Cancer Health Disparities Interest Group & Working Group

      Cancer health disparities are adverse differences between certain groups of people that include: a disproportionate number of new cases or deaths; access to screening; access to quality cancer care; stage at diagnosis; cancer risk factors; cancer-related health complications; survivorship; and quality of life. The authors list recommendations for health disparity researchers.

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    • Importance of Disaggregated Asian American Data
      , by Jacqueline B. Vo (REB) and Jaimie Z. Shing (IIB)

      Asian Americans are vastly diverse in ethnicity, language, immigration patterns, cultural beliefs, English proficiency, health outcomes, and socioeconomic status. The authors discuss improving health research of this population by disaggregating ethnicity data by country of origin (e.g., Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Asian Indian, Filipino) and utilizing reference groups other than non-Hispanic White.

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    • Neurodiversity
      , by DCEG Staff

      Neurodiversity describes the variation in the human experience of the world, in school, at work, and through social relationships. Driven by both genetic and environmental factors, an estimated 15-20 percent of the world population exhibits some form of neurodivergence. Neurodiverse individuals possess unique strengths that can improve productivity, quality, innovation, and engagement when they are working in a neurodivergent-friendly environment.

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    • Beyond the Gender Binary
      , by DCEG Staff

      The gender binary describes the inaccurate concept that gender is categorized into only two distinct forms (i.e. man/woman). Many gender-expansive identities exist either between or outside of this binary, such as genderfluid, genderqueer, non-binary or agender. Various pronouns like the singular, third person "they" may be used to reflect gender neutrality.

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    • Black Futures Month
      , by DCEG Staff

      Black Futures Month, established in 2015, is a “visionary, forward-looking spin on celebrations of Blackness in February.”

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    • Global Health Research Equity
      , by DCEG Staff

      The history of global health research, having evolved from colonial and tropical medicine, is rife with inequities due to unequal distribution of power. The authors discuss the background of inequities, and what actions can and should be taken to achieve global health equity, including removal of all forms of classism, racism, and sexism.

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    • The Curb-Cut Effect
      , by DCEG Staff

      The "Curb-Cut Effect" describes how addressing disadvantages or exclusions experienced by one group of people creates an environment that enables everyone to participate and contribute fully.

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    • Reporting Race: Use of Inclusive Language in Disparities Research
      , by DCEG Staff

      The language we choose is powerful and conveys implicit meaning, values and perspectives. It shapes how we share our identities with others and how we view others. When discussing race and ethnicity in scientific reporting, terminology and word choice are critically important.

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    • Structural Racism

      Structural racism is racism that is normalized and legitimized by the policies, institutions, and systems that govern our society (e.g., in housing, education, employment, healthcare, criminal justice, etc). Although we’ve made great progress towards achieving racial equality, outdated rules and norms of the past remain engrained in our institutions, and their harmful effects persist to this day. Learn more in this issue of Inclusivity Minute.

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