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Discovering the causes of cancer and the means of prevention
 

Integrative Tumor Epidemiology Opportunities with Specific Investigators

Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer - Postdoctoral Fellowship

Dr. Mitchell Machiela, an investigator in the DCEG Integrative Tumor Epidemiology Branch, is seeking a postdoctoral fellow with interest in conducting integrative analyses on the genetic etiology of cancer. Genetic epidemiology has remarkable potential to improve understanding of cancer etiology by identifying germline genetic variation and acquired somatic mutations associated with cancer risk. Specific areas of Dr. Machiela's research include:

  1. Next-generation sequencing studies to identify acquired mutations that could impact cancer risk in special exposure populations (e.g., drug and radiation exposure);
  2. Studies characterizing the distribution and determinants of structural mosaic copy number changes in large cancer case/control and cohort studies (~200,000 participants) with existing array genotyping data; and
  3. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in pediatric cancers to identify and functionally map germline variants associated with increased risk (e.g., Ewing sarcoma).

All studies of the genetic etiology of cancer are population-based with extensive data on exposures, genetic variation and phenotypic characterization.

Goals: The potential candidate will be part of an interdisciplinary team of genetic, bioinformatic and laboratory investigators. The NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology (DCEG) has a long tradition of carrying out large-scale, state-of-the-art population studies and has excellent computing resources for next-generation sequencing and genetic epidemiologic analyses. In addition, DCEG offers extensive career development training through its Office of Education.

Qualifications: Applicants with a doctoral degree in genetic epidemiology, genetics/genomics, statistical genetics or related field, are encouraged to apply. Experience in analyses of large complex genomic datasets, next-generation sequencing, GWAS, and/or bioinformatic methods is a plus. A successful candidate will have excellent written and verbal communication skills, be self-motivated and able to work in a multidisciplinary team. Salary and benefits are highly competitive and commensurate with experience.

For more information about this position, please contact Mitchell Machiela, Sc.D., M.P.H., Earl Stadtman Investigator.

To Apply: See the Division Fellowship Information page for an overview, qualifications, and application details.

Studies of Lung Cancer, Melanoma, and Kidney Cancer using Genomic Data - Postdoctoral Fellowship

We use genome-wide association studies (GWAS), next-generation sequencing analysis, and genome-wide methylation analysis to study risk and progression of lung cancer, melanoma, and kidney cancer. Specific goals of our research include:

  1. Identifying molecular signatures associated with environmental exposures and clinical outcomes;
  2. Identifying intra-tumor genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity and tumor evolution;
  3. Characterizing the molecular steps that lead from precursor to malignant disease;
  4. Identifying rare genetic variants associated with risk of familial melanoma.

All studies are large and population-based. We have strong collaborating biostatistics and laboratory teams, and have excellent computing resources for next-generation sequencing and genetic epidemiologic analyses.

DCEG fellows have access to data from state-of-the-art studies in cancer genomics and work with highly committed and talented researchers with expertise in epidemiology, biostatistics, and genomics. DCEG offers extensive career development training through its Office of Education.

Qualifications: Applicants with a doctoral degree or background in genetics/genomics, genetic epidemiology, or related field, are encouraged to apply. Experience in analyses of large complex genomic datasets, next-generation sequencing, GWAS, and/or bioinformatics methods is a plus. A successful candidate will have excellent communication skills, be highly motivated and able to work in a large multidisciplinary team. Salary and benefits are highly competitive and commensurate with experience.

For more information contact Maria Teresa Landi, M.D., Ph.D.

To Apply: See the Division Fellowship Information page for an overview, qualifications, and application details.

Epidemiology of Breast Cancer – Postdoctoral fellowships

The Integrative Tumor Epidemiology Branch is seeking two applicants with training in epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, genetics/genomics, or a related field to study breast cancer. Projects may include analysis of data from questionnaires and electronic health records, as well as the study of tissue, histologic/radiologic images, and circulating biomarkers to inform breast cancer risk and progression. Various approaches may be used to test hypotheses, including prospective cohorts, consortia,unique clinical databases, registry data, computational pathology, and integrative analyses of genomic (next-generation sequencing, SNP array, RNASeq, methylation) and histologic/radiologic imaging data. The successful candidates will be mentored to achieve their goals, progressing to greater independence during the fellowship. 

Qualifications: Individuals must either hold, or expect to soon attain, a doctoral degree in epidemiology, genetics/genomics or related field. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Applicants may be U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or foreign nationals (visa requirements apply). 

For more information, contact Rose Yang, Ph.D., M.P.H., senior investigator, or Gretchen Gierach, Ph.D., M.P.H., senior investigator and Deputy Branch Chief.

To Apply: See the Division Fellowship Information page for an overview, qualifications, and application details.

Candidates are subject to a background investigation. DHHS, NIH, and NCI are Equal Opportunity Employers and dedicated to building a diverse community in their training and employment programs